Exploring the ‘End of the Line’ for the 2 Train in the Bronx

On their way to the geographic northernmost station in New York City’s subway system, riders can see one of the oldest rail yards in the system: the 239th Street Yard.


What You Need To Know

  • The 2 Train runs from Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn to 241st Street in the Bronx.
  • Wakefield is on the Westchester border with both the cities of Mt. Vernon and Yonkers.
  • It is geographically the northernmost stop in the NYC Subway System.
  • Wakefield is also served by a Metro-North Station on the Harlem Line, also on 241st Street.

It’s not long before the 2 Train, after a long journey from Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn rolls into the 241st Station, and the Northern Bronx neighborhood of Wakefield. 

It’s at the intersection with White Plains Road and just blocks from the Westchester County Line.

“This is mainly on the West Indian side. A lot of Jamaicans up here, so you can find a lot of Jamaican restaurants in this area,” longtime resident Jerome Butcher told NY1.
 

Not to mention the the 2nd Star Barber Shop, which has been here for more than 30 years, and just started letting customers back into the chairs as the city entered Phase Two of reopening from coronavirus restrictions. It had been closed for three months.

“I knew a lot of kids that grew up in my hands as a barber,” said Lloyd Campbelll, who has been cutting hair at 2nd Star for two decades. 

Peppino’s Pizza has also been beneath the elevated tracks at 241st Street for years, and stayed open throughout the shutdown for takeout and delivery. 

Manager Faruk Abanoz said they were fortunate to have plenty of business. 

“Maybe 20 percent more than normally, business really went up,” said Abanoz. 

He attributes that to being the only pizza place on the block, and their location under the El. 

The 241st Street Cafe Restaurant is also a favorite spot for folks here.

Manager Sita Kepeckci said they’ve been doing okay despite not having table service, and regulars who typically hang out there for conversation have managed to stay in touch.

“Some of them call on the phone,” said Kepeckci, who confessed she sometimes has to rush them off the phone so she can get back to customers. 

As the city reopens, so does Wakefield, and residents here said they are comfortable walking around the neighborhood. 

Many of them were essential workers and have been doing it while others were quarantining. For those who did stay inside and are going out more, they said they are still going to be careful. 

“I stay with my mask and gloves,” said resident Lynette Turner, who added she sees a lot of people not doing the same. “You have to do it, you have to take care of yourself.”